Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Online Petition and Thunderclap

In an effort to attain more signatures on the online petition a thunderclap was started. We need to have 100 supporters by Oct. 1st. If we can reach that our message with the link to the online petition will be posted simulataneously on the social media networks of those supporters. Please help us reach 100 supporters https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/4752-save-kipawa-lake

Saturday, September 21, 2013

APART Petitions for a BAPE UPDATE

IMPORTANT UPDATE: these petitions must be received (originals by mail) by APART before September 30th. Please collect as many signatures as you can and send to APART as soon as possible. 

APART (association pour l’avenir des ressources témiscamiennes) has started a paper petition asking the Quebec government for the Kipawa Rare Earths project to undergo a provincial environmental impact assessment (BAPE) please print and collect signatures and then return to APART address provided on petition https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_RVu60TVfd2Z0Zpa1hfU0dsMmc/edit?usp=sharing Currently the project does not have to submit to the provincial environmental impact assessment as approximately 4000 tonnes of ore are expected to be extracted per day, to trigger a BAPE the project would have to be extracting over 7000 tonnes per day. The environmental and human health risks are the same regardless of the volume extracted each day. This is a legal loop hole. Matamec was asked to voluntarily submit to the BAPE, they said no. Help hold this company accountable help us appeal to the government so that they have to take part in a BAPE

Letter Writing Campaing Week 2

Want to do more to save Kipawa Lake?

Each week we will be posting a decision maker in government and a form letter for you to send them. The best hope we have to protect Kipawa Lake is to appeal to these decision makers. Please check back each week and send the letter to the appropriate individual. 

The Algonquin First Nations appealed to Peter Kent for an joint review panel for the Kipawa Rare 
Earths Project. Mr. Kent said no. We now have a new Environment Minister. Let's help make sure they get their joint review panel this time. This week please mail this letter (or your own version) to:

Dear Minister Aglukkaq,

I am concerned about the proposed Kipawa Rare Earths Project in the territory of Wolf Lake and Eagle Village Algonquin First Nations.

This project has the potential for significant adverse effects to the water, fish, wildlife and human uses of the area and must be reviewed in the most rigorous and participatory way possible. The review must also be consistent with Canadian law on the duty to consult and accommodate and Canada’s international obligations under the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

To meet these commitments Canada must accept in good faith the Algonquin First Nations offer to harmonize their review process with Canada in a joint review panel.

I fully endorse the First Nations call for a joint review panel for the Kipawa Project.

Sincerely,

Name/signature
Address

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Letter Writing Campaign

Each week we will be posting a decision maker in government and a form letter for you to send them. The best hope we have to protect Kipawa Lake is to appeal to these decision makers. Please check back each week and send the letter to the appropriate individual. 

This week please mail this letter (or your own version) to:


Yves-François Blanchet
Ministère du Développement durable, de l'Environnement et des Parcs
Édifice Marie-Guyart
675, boul. René-Lévesque Est, 30e étage
Québec (Quebec) G1R 5V7
Fax: 418-643-4143
ministre@mddefp.gouv.qc.ca

Dear Mr. Blanchet,
I am concerned about the proposed Kipawa Rare Earths project by Matamec Explorations Inc. Currently the project is not subject to a provincial environmental impact assessment in Quebec (BAPE). The reason for this is simply due to the tonnage extracted per day (it being under 7,000 tonnes). I am concerned because I believe a project that extracts 4,200 tonnes or 7,000 tonnes will have the same environmental impact and therefore should be required to go through the same approval process and public hearings. This project has the potential to adversely effect the water, fish, wildlife and human uses of the area. I as a citizen of Canada, am asking you to please require the project to undergo a full environmental study in Quebec (BAPE), so that we may all be better informed of the risks and have a better opportunity for input.


Thank you,

Name/signature
Address


Attention Mr. Blanchet,
Le projet de terres rares Kipawa par Matamec Explorations Inc me préoccupe beaucoup. Présentement, le projet n'est pas soumis à une évaluation de l'impact environnemental provincial au Québec (BAPE) puisque l'extraction sera moins que le 7000 tonnes par jour exigé pour l'évaluation. À mon avis, ce projet, qui prévoit l'extraction de 4200 tonnes par jour, aura le même impact sur l'environnement et ainsi devrait être assujetti au même processus d'approbation et d'audiences publiques. Nous sommes inquiets, ce projet a le potentiel d'affecter négativement l'eau, les poissons, la faune, et les humains de la region. À titre de Canadienne et de Québécoise, j'exige que ce projet soit soumis à une étude environnementale exhaustive (BAPE); nous serons alors tous mieux informés sur les risques et les recours à notre disposition.

Merci,

Nom
Address

Friday, August 2, 2013

SAVE KIPAWA LAKE

SAVE KIPAWA LAKE
Kipawa Lake is located along the Ontario/Quebec border North of Ottawa and East of North Bay. It is the headwaters for Lake Temiscaming as well as the Ottawa River. It is a vast body of water with over 900 km of natural shoreline. A moratorium on development was imposed in the 1980s allowing Kipawa to remain a pristine wilderness area with road access within a one day drive of the GTA, Ottawa, Montreal and other major centers. Tourists travel from all over the world to enjoy the beauty and serenity of this region, to hunt, fish, canoe, kayak and vacation.  The land has a rich cultural and historical significance to the local Algonquin First Nations who still inhabit the region and rely on hunting and fishing.  Unfortunately, this could all change and soon, plans are in place to lift the moratorium and allow development on Kipawa’s shores that will irreversibly and forever destroy this natural paradise. Proposed development includes a rare earth mine project by Matamec Explorations Inc. No rare earth element mine has operated in the world without significant damage to the environment and human health. Canada’s Environmental Laws while more stringent than many other countries were not written with this type of project in mind. Should this project be allowed to proceed it will be the first of its kind in Canada and our environmental laws are not sufficient to protect this vulnerable wilderness area. Rare earth mining has the ability to release radioactive isotopes, heavy metals and other contaminants that would not only be detrimental to the health of the environment, aquatic and terrestrial organisms but that would also render the water unsafe to drink, the wild plants, fish and wild game unsafe to eat and the air unsafe to breathe. The health effects on the local population would be many including chronic illness and elevated cancer rates.  Allowing industrial development on Kipawa Lake will provide a short term economic gain while protecting the region from development will allow Canadians to experience the natural beauty of this region, escape from the city to reconnect with nature and allow First Nations to continue their traditional way of life for generations to come – this is priceless. Time is running out but it is not too late. We must act fast to save Kipawa Lake.

What you can do to help:

***NEW - APART (association pour l’avenir des ressources témiscamiennes) has started a paper petition asking the Quebec government for the Kipawa Rare Earths project to undergo a provincial environmental impact assessment (BAPE) please print and collect signatures and then return to APART address provided on petition https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_RVu60TVfd2Z0Zpa1hfU0dsMmc/edit?usp=sharing Currently the project does not have to submit to the provincial environmental impact assessment as approximately 4000 tonnes of ore are expected to be extracted per day, to trigger a BAPE the project would have to be extracting over 7000 tonnes per day. The environmental and human health risks are the same regardless of the volume extracted each day. This is a legal loop hole. Matamec was asked to voluntarily submit to the BAPE, they said no. Help hold this company accountable help us appeal to the government so that they have to take part in a BAPE***

***NEW - we now have an official government paper petition to address rare earth mining in Kipawa. Please print, collect signatures and return original to Elizabeth May of the Green Party of Canada postage is free English Version https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_RVu60TVfd2aDlieXpWTmtFeXM/edit French Version https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_RVu60TVfd2UXBobUJteFFnSnM/edit?usp=sharing ***


2.       ‘Like’ Save Kipawa Lake on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SaveKipawaLake  and visit http://www.savekipawalake.blogspot.com/ to learn more about these threats.

3.       Write letters to the decision makers (Martine Oulette, Leona Aglukkaq and Yves-Francois Blanchet). In your letter be sure to tell them your personal story, why Kipawa Lake is important to you and your family, send photos of Kipawa Lake so the decision makers will have a better idea of what we are at risk of losing. If you are a tourist (even from outside of Canada) be sure to include how long you’ve been visiting the area and how much you spent on your vacations. This will help show how important tourism is to the local economy as well as the economy of Canada. Once you’ve written your letter please email us savekipawalake@gmail.com to let us know you’ve sent a letter. See addresses below.

Write to the Minister of Natural Resources, Quebec asking to keep the moratorium in place and not allow development, especially mining, on Kipawa’s shores

Martine Ouellette
Ministère des Ressources naturelles                                                                                                                  
5700, 4e Avenue Ouest
Bureau A 301
Québec (Quebec)  G1H 6R1
Fax: 418-643-4318

To put a stop to mining near Kipawa please send letters requesting that the Kipawa Rare Earths Project by Matamec Explorations Inc. not be allowed to proceed, tell them that the project is not socially acceptable in the region and that it should be subject to a BAPE (évaluation du Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement) environmental evaluation to provide more opportunity for public input and evaluation of potential risks. Ask that a moratorium on mining exploration and development be put in place on Kipawa Lake to protect it for the enjoyment of future generations and to preserve the way of life of the local Algonquin First Nations. Letters should be sent to:

The Honourable Leona Aglukkaq
Minister of the Environment
Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, 28th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Fax: 819-953-0279
Minister@ec.gc.ca

and 

Yves-François Blanchet
Ministère du Développement durable, de l'Environnement et des Parcs
Édifice Marie-Guyart
675, boul. René-Lévesque Est, 30e étage
Québec (Quebec)  G1R  5V7
Fax: 418-643-4143
ministre@mddefp.gouv.qc.ca

Sunday, July 28, 2013

Mining NOT Socially Accepted in Kipawa!

From Matamec's March 31st report "Social acceptability has become imperative, in an effort to obtain authorisation for any mining projects. The Management Team at Matamec Explorations has from the very beginning encouraged the participation of the population of Temiscaming in the development of its Kipawa project. " Now is the time to speak up! Let Matamec know that mining is NOT socially accepted on Kipawa Lake or any where in the region. Say NO to polluted water, radioactive isotopes in the air you breathe, the water you drink and the berries, fish and wild game that you eat. Say NO to increased cancer rates and chronic illness, organism death and habitat loss. Speak out now or watch silently as the region is forever and irreversibly destroyed. Start by signing and sharing the petition on change.org, 'like' Save Kipawa Lake on facebook and contact us (savekipawalake@gmail.com) to find out what you can do to become more involved in the fight to save Kipawa Lake.

http://www.matamec.com/vns-site/uploads/documents/matamec-mda-mars2013.pdf

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Risks of Mining Rare Earths

Open pit rare earth mining poses several risks to the environment and human health. Rare earth ores are normally extracted using strip mining which consists of vegetation clearing, soil removal, drilling and often blasting followed by stripping and removal of the ore of interest. Any open pit mining operation allows harmful substances to enter the air, soil and water. Rare earth mining poses additional risks due to the presence of radioactive substances as well as the chemicals used during processing. The toxicity of the rare earth elements themselves are still not understood.

Nearly all open pit mining operations have the potential to release aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, lead, manganese, silver, zinc, barium, beryllium, sulfide minerals, fluorine and asbestos. The risks to the environment and human health of many of these substances is listed in the table below.

Substance
Effects on the environment and human health

Rare Earth Elements
Toxicity and effects on the environment and human health still not understood

Sulfide Minerals
Creates sulfuric acid – acid mine drainage, decreasing the pH of water, which acids in the further release of sulfide minerals further decreasing the pH (positive feedback loop) decreased pH allows more metals and acid to be released into the environment

Aluminum
Can enter air, soil, water. Aquatic organisms are more sensitive to aluminum. Toxic to fish. In humans elevated levels cause developmental problems in children and pulmonary issues.

Arsenic
Can enter air, soil, water. Very mobile – travels long distances in the air before settling. Toxic to humans, human carcinogen. Increases risk of skin cancer. Low levels cause nausea, change in heart rhythms, low white blood cell count. Chronic exposure causes gastrointestinal issues, fatigue, blood disorders, and neuropathy. At high levels will cause death. All mammals experience same effects as humans. In aquatic organisms causes genetic mutations and cancer. In plants causes wilting, dehydration and death.

Lead
Once released will accumulate in soils. In plants decreases photosynthesis rates and water absorption. Major health concern for humans, especially children under 7 years of age. Causes negative effects on the cardiovascular, endocrine, muscular, nervous, reproductive and respiratory system, may cause death. Likely a carcinogen. Same effects are seen in mammals, birds and fish.

Manganese
Can impair gastrointestinal, muscular and neurobehavioral function.

Zinc
Toxic in large amounts. In aquatic plants and animals causes decreased growth and reproduction and increased mortality. In mammals (including humans) impairs the nervous and cardiovascular systems. At elevated levels will cause liver and kidney issues.

Barium
Can enter groundwater. Harmful effects on the muscular system, disruption of heart rhythms and paralysis. Ingestion results in gastrointestinal irritation and kidney damage. Toxicity of barium to aquatic and terrestrial organisms is unknown.
Beryllium
Very mobile, can travel in the air and able to enter soil and water. Inhalation causes acute beryllium disease (reddening and swelling of the lungs). Human carcinogen (lung cancer).

Copper
Toxic to plants and animals at high levels. Aquatic organisms are extremely sensitive to copper exposure – causes death in aquatic organisms. Slowed growth and development in terrestrial organisms. Irritant to nose and throat when inhaled. Causes nausea, vomiting, diarrhea when ingested. Can lead to kidney and liver damage or death at high levels.

Radionuclides
Thorium-232 and Uranium-238 are radioactive substances that persist in the environment for thousands of years. They produce over 30 other radioactive substances as they undergo decay. Ability to alter biologic molecules and cause mutations and cancer.




Almost all wastes and by-products generated during rare earth mining and processing are radioactive, containing uranium or thorium. Uranium-238 and Thorium-232 are the most common isotopes found associated with rare earth elements. Uranium-238 is water soluble and is a common contaminate of groundwater. Thorium-232 is able to travel long distances, it is very mobile and can contaminate air, soil and water. Radioactive substances are often taken up by plants and from there they are able to bioaccumulate.  Uranium-238 and Thorium-232 and their decay products remain in the environment for thousands of years and pose serious risks. Radioactive decay releases energetic particles, these particles can dislodge electrons found in biologic molecules such as in water, protein and DNA. The ionizing radiation from radioactive decay is a known human carcinogen. The Uranium-238 decay chain includes Radium 226 which produces radon-222 (gas) and bismuth-214 both of which are dangerous radioactive substances.Radon-222 is inhaled and once in the lungs there is a great risk of developing cancer. Radon-222 is carcinogenic to all organisms.

 Methods for proper handling and disposal of uranium and thorium have not yet been developed and this is one of the greatest challenges faced by the rare earth industry. Several projects have been shut down or delayed due to issues with thorium handling and disposal. Among them are the Lynas Corp. Plant in Malaysia and a Mistsubishi rare earth plan in Malaysia. Environmental and human health concerns over thorium are also the main reasons that the Chinese have slowed their production of rare earths. While Canada does have strict environmental laws in comparison to many other nations, Canada's environmental laws were not written with rare earth mining in mind. Canada's Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER) were not designed to manage or regulate all of the hazardous substances released during rare earth mining and ore processing. The MMER does not consider thorium and uranium harmful substances and does not impose controls upon their release into the environment. Since their release during mining activities is not associated with the nuclear fuel cycle they are not regulated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC).  The MMER imposes maximum daily discharge limits on arsenic, copper, cyanide, lead, nickel, zinc, total suspended solids and radium-226. The other harmful substances that could be released are not regulated.

Harsh chemicals are also used during the processing of rare earth ores. Strong acids and bases and other toxic chemicals that further ad to the risks associated with extracting rare earth ores. These chemicals must be transported to the mine site putting other areas at risk should spillage occur during transport. Spills or accidents may occur on site with the handling of these chemicals. Wastes produced also need to be properly managed to prevent their entrance into the surrounding environment.

Rare earth mining also releases many air pollutants including: nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide, particulate matter and dustfall. Greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, are also released. Many companies market their rare earth operations as 'green' operations with a respect for the environment as a few uses of rare earth elements are in products designed to conserve energy or lower carbon emissions (greenhouse gases). However the procedures used to obtain these metals are quite damaging to the environment and they themselves release greenhouse gases. In addition the vast majority of rare earth metals are not for 'green' technologies. Rare earths are found in batteries, magnets, motors, LCD screens, catalytic converters, glass polishing compounds, they are used in oil refining and have been declared vital to the U.S. National Defense as they are used in missile guidance systems and  in laser based targeting equipment.

Canadian environmental laws are insufficient to protect the environment and humans from the risks associated with rare earth mining. In addition, very little is known about the risks associated with the rare earth elements themselves. Therefore, further study and reevaluation of environmental laws should be carried out before any rare earth mine projects are considered.

Unfortunately, many companies such as Matamec are currently 'fast tracking' their projects to meet market demand rather than allowing for further study and a reevaluation of environmental laws to ensure the safety of surrounding environments. Matamec recently entered into a memorandum of understanding with Toyota Tsusho Corp. to fast track the development of the Kipawa Rare Earths project.

Please help us convince the government of Quebec and Canada that further study is needed before this project can proceed to fully evaluate the risks this project would impose on the pristine Kipawa Lake watershed and the health risks to nearby communities.

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References:



Sunday, July 14, 2013

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Please send your Kipawa photos to savekipawalake@gmail.com to have them added to the Save Kipawa Lake photostream.

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Algonquin First Nation leaders express concern over Kipawa Rare Earths

Wolf Lake and Eagle Village First Nation leaders express their concerns over the Kipawa Rare Earths project and call for a joint review panel for the federal environmental impact assessment. Their request for a joint review was denied. 

http://www.miningwatch.ca/news/algonquin-nations-call-joint-review-panel-rare-earths-project

Algonquin Nations Call for Joint Review Panel for Rare Earths Project

Source: 
 Wolf Lake and Eagle Village Algonquin First Nations
Wolf Lake First Nation
Hunter’s Point, P.O. Box 998
Temiscaming, QC J0Z 3R0                       
Tel: 819-627-3628 
Fax: 819-627-1109 
Eagle Village First Nation-Kipawa
Migizy Odenaw, P.O. Box 756
Temiscaming, QC J0Z 3R0
Tel: 819-627-3455
Fax: 819-627-9428
PRESS RELEASE

Algonquins Call for Joint Environmental Review Panel for Proposed Matamec/Toyota Rare Earth Elements Open Pit Mine in Kipawa, Quebec

(Kipawa, Quebec) Our two Algonquin First Nations are aware that the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) has initiated an environmental assessment of a proposed Kipawa Rare Earth Elements open pit mine. The proposed mine site is located within, and has the potential to significantly affect, the shared traditional territories of our two First Nations.
As Algonquin First Nation Governments who represent our Algonquin peoples our duty is to protect our lands, waters and environment for our present and future generations.
Rare earth mines can be the source of significant toxics that risk being released to the environment including radioactive elements (uranium and thorium) and the poorly understood rare earth elements themselves. Existing regulatory regimes in Quebec and Canada have not been designed with rare earth elements in mind, pointing to the need for additional, closer scrutiny of the Project.
As Wolf Lake Chief Harry St. Denis stated today “we are concerned that the standard Environmental Assessment process will not adequately address our concerns about the potential for adverse environmental impacts from the Project. As it stands now, the mine does not trigger an environmental assessment under Quebec legislation so the federal Environmental Assessment will be the only one done for this proposed mine.”
Chief St. Denis added “we have determined that a Joint Review Panel pursuant to section 38(C) of the CEAA with our Algonquin First Nation Governments would provide a much more appropriate means of evaluating this Project and we have written to the federal Minister of the Environment Peter Kent calling on him to establish a Joint Review Panel.”
Eagle Village Chief Madeleine Paul also stated today “from meetings that have been held in our two Algonquin First Nation communities we know that there is a high degree of public concern among our Algonquin Peoples and also within the non-Algonquin population. While the environmental impacts and public concern are reason enough to refer the Project to a review panel, we feel the real opportunity with a Joint Federal-Algonquin Panel is in the potential for inter-jurisdictional cooperation with our two Algonquin First Nation Governments (Eagle Village & Wolf Lake).”
The proponents of the proposed Rare Earth Elements open pit mine are Matamec Explorations Inc. a junior mining exploration company with the financial support of Toyota Tsusho Corporation.
In parallel, the Company is exploring more than 35km of strike length in the Kipawa Alkalic Complex for rare earths-yttrium-zirconium-niobium-tantalum mineralization on the shared territory of the Algonquin First Nations.




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The MRC Temiscaming and the Kipawa Rare Earths proposal by Matamec

The MRC Temiscaming is in favor of the Kipawa Rare Earths proposal by Matamec provided Matamec abides by government imposed rules and regulations. Norman Young (Mayor of Kipawa) and André Paquet (Mayor Fugèreville) and Claudine Laforge Clouâtre (Mayor of St-Édouard-de-Fabre) voted against the project and expressed their concerns relating to a lack of information on the health and environmental risks. All other 17 members voted for the project. The 17 votes for the project were the Mayors of Angliers, Bearn, Duhamel-Ouest, Guerin, Laforce, Latulipe-et-Gaboury, Laverlochere, Lorrainville, Moffet, Nedelec, Notre-Dame-du-Nord, Remigny, St-Bruno-de-Guigues, St-Eugene-de-Guigues, Belleterre, Temiscamingue and Ville-Marie. I applaud those Mayors who voiced their concerns. I am concerned about the fact that Mayors of towns so far away have such an influence on what happens in this area.

The document containing this information can be viewed by visiting https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_RVu60TVfd2NkJPdEdXLVJoSlk/edit?usp=sharing




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Thursday, July 11, 2013

Kipawa Rare Earths Project


The Kipawa Rare Earths Project is being carried out by Matamec Explorations Inc. a junior mining company, in collaboration with Toyotsu Rare Earth Canada (Toyota). The project involves the creation of an open pit mine (with dimensions of 1500 meters in length by 320 meters wide and a depth of 110 meters), 2 waste rock piles, an ore processing plant as well as rejects and tailings disposal on site and within the Kipawa watershed. The mine is expected to be in production for a period of approximately 13 years with 1.5 million tonnes of ore being treated per year. The project anticipated to commence early in 2014 with the clearing of the land and building construction. Other operations such as blasting and ore processing will being in 2015 and continue until 2028. A project of this nature usually requires 7-20 years of planning to implement, however this project is being 'fast tracked' to meet market demand.



The open pit mine will be located along the Kipawa River near Brennan (Sairs) Lake and Sheffield Lake. Rejects and tailings storage will occur on site. Exact location of these facilities has not yet been determined but potential sites appear to be wetland areas located within the Kipawa Watershed. Three potential sites for tailings storage were identified.

Potential tailings storage sites:





Aerial Views of Potential Tailings Storage Sites





The radioactivity, leachability and acid generation potential of the rejects and tailings have still not been determined. There will be two waste rock piles with a capacity of 28 metric tonnes and an elevation of 365 meters.The tailings and reject storage sites will have a capacity of 20.4 metric tonnes. The rejects will be piled and a drainage system will be implemented to collect water, the details on this system are not yet available. The tailings storage will be lined with a geomembrane and confined by a dike, exact specifications of the tailing storage and methods to prevent contamination to surrounding areas are not yet available.

A significant amount of waste water will be produced. Waste water will include mine water, run off from waste rock piles, tailings site, rejects site, industrial site as well as process water. The discharge points of this waste water and treatment methods, if any, are not yet available. Water will enter the open mine pit via precipitation, infiltration, it along with other waste water will be pumped into a sedimentation pond. A trench system will be installed around the open pit, waste rock piles, rejects site to direct water to the sediment pond. Water from the sediment pond will be discharged to nearby water bodies, exact locations have not yet been determined. Information on treatment of this waste water prior to discharge is not available. It will only be carried out if necessary to comply with environmental laws. It is important to note that rare earth mining has never been carried out in Canada. The Metal Mining and Effluent Regulations are not designed to manage the environmental risks of this type of mining. These laws do not regulate all of the substances that could be released during rare earth mining. An additional effluent will be installed from the water that is spilt on the tailings site, the location of this discharge point has not yet been determined.

Fresh water intakes will be required for the mine as well as the plant. Water use is estimated at 190-210 meters cubed of freshwater per hour. The exact location of draw for this freshwater has not yet been determined. Dust will be released during blasting, ore crushing, milling and transportation by truck. Changes to existing forestry roads and new access roads will be required including a bridge over the Kipawa River. The rare earth concentrate will be transported to Temiscaming via truck and then by rail to ports on the Pacific Coast or St. Lawrence for shipping to Asia or Europe. It is estimated that two containers of concentrate will be produced per day.

Processing the ore involves crushing, milling, magnetic separation, leaching using strong acids, rinsing and neutralizing using strong bases, such as Lime. These strong acids and bases will be transported to the processing facility by truck from Ontario via HWY 63 and the Maniwaki Road, putting other watersheds at risk should an accident or truck roll over occur. Wastes generated during the processing of the ore will remain on site in the reject rock piles, tailings sites or released into the Kipawa watershed as effluent.
Processing Plant Location

Aerial View of Processing Plant Location

This forest will be replaced by the open Pit Rare Earths Mine
Details of the ore processing procedures

For more information please visit:

http://www.miningwatch.ca/article/rare-earth-elements-background-information

http://www.ceaa.gc.ca/050/details-eng.cfm?evaluation=80029


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Environmentalists dirty little secret, rare earth elements



So called 'green' technologies are in fact not green at all. We have been mislead into thinking we are doing a good deed for the plant by using a compact fluorescent light bulb, buying a hybrid car, using wind and solar energy. Meanwhile these technologies require rare earth elements and the process of extracting them is extremely harmful to the environment and human health. We are replacing one environmental problem with another. Rare earth elements are found in many modern day conveniences, smart phones, lap tops, tvs, we need to develop better methods of recycling these elements and methods of producing 'green' technologies that truly are green.


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